Today’s Tip – Full Frontal View

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Collomia grandiflora - Large-Flowered Collomia, flowering annual wildflower in Martin's Meadow Eldorado National Forest

Collomia grandiflora - Large-Flowered Collomia, flowering annual wildflower in Martin's Meadow Eldorado National Forest

I like to see the full frontal view of flowers – point of view can make the difference in how we appreciate so many things. With flowers, it’s too easy to look down on them, diminishing their natural beauty.

Ever notice how the best kindergarten teachers get down to look at the children in the face, not looking down on them? I like to treat flowers the same way.

There are times when you do want a straight on, face-to-face view, looking directly into a flower, such as a sunflower or daisy; but there other times when the flower photographer is an illustrator, and will want to see the scale of a flower and what it looks like in relation to the plant and garden around it.

Solidago canadensis ssp. elongata, Canada Goldenrod flowering in California native plant Sierra meadow
Solidago canadensis -Canada Goldenrod flowering in California native plant Sierra meadow

I think this is especially true when photographing wildflowers. Getting down to their level allows you to see them at their own point of view.  Often this becomes a belly shot but it truly shows the flower in its own world and the photo becomes an illustration celebrating the full frontal view.

Sidalcea hartwegii - Valley Checkerbloom - annual wildflower California native plant in Sierra meadow
Standing in a meadow looking down on checker bloom, California native wildflower.
Sidalcea hartwegii - Valley Checkerbloom - annual wildflower California native plant in Sierra meadow
Sidalcea hartwegii – Valley Checkerbloom – belly shot IN the meadow.

I admit it does sometimes pose problems getting down on the ground for those belly shots, but it’s certainly easier in the wild than in a garden, where you are probably restrained by pathways and larger plants.

In the wild, yes you need to be careful about trampling the surrounding flowers, but getting down in a meadow to photograph wildflowers, as I did recently, means, well, getting down … and lying in a meadow.  The Allure of Meadows.

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point of viewPoint of View is a lesson in the PhotoBotanic Garden Photography Workshop for Premium members and it’s own mini e-book available in the Store through iTunes or Google Play for $1.99.

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